5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails

5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails

We absolutely love these whiskey cocktails, and you should too!

If you don’t know these 5 whiskey cocktails, then you don’t know Jack. That’s a little whiskey humor there for you. Earlier we did a blog post of 5 of Scotch cocktails every whiskey lover should know, and we are back to give you more. We absolutely love these 5 cheers worthy whiskey cocktails, and you should too! Here’s why!

5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails

 


 

Whiskey Sour

5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails - The Whiskey Sour

Image / Recipe from // Brio Drink of the week

If you’ve never had a whiskey cocktail before, a whiskey sour is a great place to start. It’s a great blend of whiskey, lemon juice, and a bit of sweetness that you might be looking for in a good cocktail. Americans have an almost natural affinity for good whiskey, which is why we have a long history with the stuff. The Whiskey Sour shares a common history with the Gimlet on the high seas when scurvy was common among sailors. American sailors would put lime and lemon juices in their whiskey to prevent vitamin C deficiency. It was bartender, Jerry Thomas who later would refine the recipe to the classic whiskey sour that we know today. Egg whites were not introduced until later to add a frothiness to the cocktial, but it always remains optional.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Good Whiskey
  • 1 Ounce Lemon Juice
  • 3/4 Ounce Simple Syrup
  • Cherry for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Old Fashioned Glasses
  • Cocktail Shaker

How to make a Whiskey Sour

Add the whiskey, lemon juice, and simple syrup to a Cocktail Shaker with ice. Shake together. Fill an old fashioned or rocks glass with crushed ice [regular ice works too]. Strain over ice, and garnish with a cherry.

 

The New Yorker

5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails - The New Yorker

Image / Recipe from // Greg Henry – SippitySup

If you are a fan of an Old Fashioned, then the New Yorker is right in your wheel house. Like it’s cousin the Manhattan, the New Yorker falls into the class of whiskey cocktails that got its name from the Big Apple. New Yorkers must really have a thing for whiskey.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 1½ Ounces Bourbon or Rye Whiskey
  • 3/4 Ounce Fresh Lime Juice
  • 1 Teaspoon Sugar
  • 1 Dash Grenadine Syrup
  • Orange & Lemon Twists for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Old Fashioned Glasses
  • Long Spoon

How to make a New Yorker

Pour whiskey and lime juice over ice in an old-fashioned glass. Add sugar and grenadine syrup. Stir together, and garnish with the twist peels.

 

Whiskey Ginger [Ale]

5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails - The Whiskey Ginger

Image / Recipe from // Jameson Whiskey

Closely related to the Horse’s Neck and the Presbyterian, the whiskey ginger is a two ingredient cocktail that every whiskey lover has probably had in some way shape or form before. It’s because the cocktail is so versatile. There are many versions and off shoots of it. This recipe from Jameson Whiskey is called the Jameson Ginger and lime. You’ll want a good quality ginger ale if you want to stick to the recipe and use Jameson Whiskey. Blenheim is a good choice. We don’t know why ginger ale and whiskey came together, but it’s been a happy marriage.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Whiskey
  • Ginger Ale
  • Lime Wedge for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Highball Glass

How to make a Whiskey Ginger

Add ice to a Highball glass, and pour in whiskey. Top with ginger ale. Squeeze the lime and pop it into the drink.

 

The Irish Redhead

5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails - The Jameson Irish Redhead

Image / Recipe from // Brio Drink of the week

This cocktail is great for our Jameson lovers out there. The Irish Redhead has a flavor palate that is similar to a Whiskey Ginger. You could even substitute the club soda for ginger ale if you want a spicier kick. After all, whiskey and ginger are kind of a match made in heaven.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 3 Ounces Jameson Whiskey
  • 1 Ounces Grenadine
  • 6 Ounces Club Soda
  • 1/2 Ounce Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 Ounce Fresh Lime Juice
  • Cherries for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Scotch Glass
  • Mixing Glass
  • Bar Spoon

How to make an Irish Redhead

Fill Scotch glass with ice as desired. In a mixing glass, mix together Jameson, grenadine, and lemon and lime juices. Pour into the glass, and top with club soda or ginger ale. Add a cherry on top.

 

The Witty Comeback

5 Cheers Worthy Whiskey Cocktails - The Witty Comeback

Image // Alex Lau / Recipe from // Dan Saltzstein – bon appetit

As far as whiskey drinks go, this one has a name worthy of some intrigue. The recipe was the brain child of Dan Saltzstein, and later named by Michael Y. Park – who should name all cocktails for now on. This cocktail pairs rye whiskey with Averna amaro, and Italian liquor that has citrusy herbal notes. You are in for a treat if you’ve never had the chance to try it. In Dan’s recipe, he suggests using Old Overholt rye whiskey. Old Overholt is one of those “bottom shelf” whiskeys that you hear a lot of good things about. It’s not bad for the price tag, and if you don’t end up liking the Witty Comeback, it tastes good with ginger ale.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Rye Whiskey
  • ½ Ounce Averna amaro
  • ½ Ounce Fresh Lemon Juice
  • ½ Ounce Ginger Simple Syrup
  • Cherry for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Coupe or Old Fashioned Glasses
  • Cocktail Shaker

How to make The Witty Comeback

Combine rye, Averna, lemon juice, and ginger simple syrup in a cocktail shaker. Fill shaker with ice. Shake about 30 seconds. Strain into a coupe glass or a old-fashioned glass filled with ice and garnish with orange twist.

 

 

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Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

Making a Classic Whiskey Sour

Ultimate Whiskey Sour Recipe

Making A Classic Whiskey Sour

A good whiskey sour never goes out of style. Grab your whiskey and we’ll show you how to make a classic whiskey sour.

Drink of the week: Classic Whiskey Sour

Happy National Whiskey Sour Day Brio drink of the week lovers! In respect of this delicious holiday, we are going to show you how to whip up this classic Whiskey Sour recipe. No Frills. No Fuss. No Coconuts. Seriously. There will be no fruity twist on this classic on my watch….well besides the cherry on top.

I’m a girl who loves her whiskey. I think it’s important for us ladies to find a whiskey we like. It opens you up to a whole new world of cocktails. We’ve actually done a few whiskey cocktails in the past where I am very specific on the bottling. That way you can explore a bit, and if you don’t happen to like that whiskey you can always try another.

With a whiskey sour, I’m a little more lenient. My go-to’s for a whiskey sour are Jack Daniels Tennessee Whiskey and Jameson Irish Whiskey. However, there are some Canadian whiskeys that make a good whiskey sour, like Pike Creek. I like Pike Creek, it has a little bit of a sweet finish to it. If you are new to Canadian whiskey, it’s a good place to start.

Some individuals commit the vile sin of using cheap store bought Sour Mix when they make a Whiskey Sour. If you are currently using Master of Mixes, I pray for your misguided villainous souls. If you want good cocktails at home – Stop that right now!

#JudgingYou

via GIPHY // Both Tyra and I am #JudgingYou

Any decent bartender will tell you that a good whiskey sour is made with fresh lemon juice, not sour mix. Bars that use sour mix cannot afford fresh ingredients, so when you make it fresh the cocktail will taste much different – better even. Do yourself a favor and do not commit this sin.

Lastly, you can use either granulated sugar or simple syrup if you have it on hand to make a whiskey sour. [Read: Easy Made Simple Syrup Recipe] Some folks also put egg white in this cocktail, but it’s not necessary. I find it tastes better without it, and most bartenders don’t use it anymore in this cocktail.

Here is how to make a classic whiskey sour!

 

Whiskey Sour

Yields: 1 Serving

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Good Whiskey
  • 1 Ounce Lemon Juice
  • 3/4 Ounce Simple Syrup
  • Cherry for Garnish

Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Old Fashioned Glasses
  • Cocktail Shaker

 

Preparation

Whiskey Sour: Add the whiskey, lemon juice, and simple syrup to a Cocktail Shaker with ice. Shake together. Fill an old fashioned or rocks glass with crushed ice [regular ice works too]. Strain over ice, and garnish with a cherry. Enjoy!

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 162 Fat (g) 0.1 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Potassium (mg) 19.08 Carbohydrates (g) 13.5 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 13.5 Protein (g) 0.1 Sodium (mg) 65

Making a Classic Whiskey Sour

 

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Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

How to decode your wine labels

How to Decode Your Wine Labels

Making sense of the labels on wine bottles

Wine marketers use a lot of terms to describe their wine. But what do those terms really mean? Let’s take a look on how to decode your wine labels.

What do those terms on your wine labels really mean? Check out this quick guide to decode your wine labels.

 

Organic

The use of term “organic” is regulated by the US government and there are different levels of how “organic” a wine can be. To be organic, the wine must be made without the use of prohibited substances, genetic engineering of ingredients, and must be certified by the USDA. A 100% ‘organic’ wine contains no commercial fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, or added sulfites. They also may not be required to have the “Contains Sulfites” label on the bottle.

[learn more about organic rules from the USDA: Organic 101: Organic Wine]

Biodynamic

If you see a label on your wine bottle that says “DEMETER” on it, you’ve found yourself a biodynamic wine. “What the heck is biodynamic wine?” You might ask. Well, Biodynamic viniculture is a practice of planting, growing, and harvesting of grapes that follows a biodynamic, or lunar calendar. This philosophy of wine growing takes organic to a new level. Biodynamic growers believe in not using chemicals or commercial fertilizers or yeast in the wine making process. It’s all about using natural ingredients to grow and cultivate the wine.

[learn more about Biodynamic wine from the Organic Wine Company: What makes biodynamic wine so special?]

“Sulfite Free”

Sorry to say, there really is no such thing as Sulfite free wine. Sulfites are created as part of the fermentation process, so all wines have them to some extent or another. This term is used by wine marketers to say that they do not ADD sulfites to their wines. These wines are also marketed as “no sulfite added” or “NSA” wine. If you have sulfite allergy or sensitivity, though, it is best to avoid or limit drinking wine, especially red wine which has a higher sulfite content than whites.

[learn more about sulfite allergy & sensitivity: Tell-tale Signs That You Might Be Allergic to Alcohol or Wine]

Sustainable

The Sustainable label discerns an energy conscious type of wine making that protects the Earth. Most Sustainable Wine comes from California, where resources can be scarce because of drought. Many Sustainable wine makers use alternative forms of energy or energy saving practices, and converse water through the use of drip irrigation and by saving run off water from the wine making process. The process isn’t as restrictive as organic growing and allows the use of some herbicides, but also requires certification.

[learn more about California Sustainable Winegrowing (CCSW): California Sustainable Winegrowing]

Vegan

Some wine companies have adopted a Vegan process to wine making. This means that they have removed the use of animal products like isinglass [fish bladder protein], gelatin, casein [milk protein], and albumen [egg whites] which are sometimes used in the filtering/clarifying process of wine, known as fining. Mary Gorman-McAdams, a New York based wine educator, explained that egg whites are used to remove tannins from red wine which gives the wine a better texture. Vegan wines substitute these animal products for clay-based and charcoal fining agents, or skip the fining process altogether. Wine that has not been fined or filtered usually have a label that says ‘not fined and/or not filtered’ on the bottle.

[learn more from Mary Gorman-McAdams: Why Egg Whites Are Used to Make Wine?]

 

Bill, wine blogger at Brio Smart Life
 

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Bill – The Wine Guy

Marketing Guy | Wine Connoisseur | Booze Food Guru | Hawaiian Shirt Lover

How Alcohol Influenced Events in World History

How Alcohol Influenced World History

The Interesting Stories Of How Alcohol Influenced World History

This isn’t your regular history class. From the ancient Greeks to American Mobsters, we’ve uncovered some very surprising stories on how alcohol influenced world history.

The Gods & Goddesses of Wine

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via Fatimaa Ahmed // Early civilizations believed alcohol was a gift from the gods

Humans have been crafting alcoholic beverages since Babylonian times. Countless cultures worshiped Gods and Goddesses of wines and other spirits. These gods and goddesses, like Dionysus/Bacchus and Nin-kasi, were often attributed to grape harvests, beer or wine, drunkenness, fertility, and partying. Fun fact: The ancient Greeks might have conducted the first research into how alcohol effects the body, and warned against the consumption of too much alcohol.

Explorers of the New World Spent more on Liquor than Other Supplies

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via History.com // Travelers to the New World really loved their Sherry

Christopher Columbus and Ferdinand Magellan had two things in common: 1. They were explorers who made world history with Columbus “discovering” America and Magellan as the first European explorer to reach Asia by sailing westwards around America; 2. They both carried very large quantities of Sherry on their journeys. Columbus taking Sherry with him on his exploration made it the first wine brought to the New World. Magellan carried 253 kegs of Sherry on his voyage and this stockpile of alcohol actually cost more money than all of his weapons! An extra bonus, Magellan spent more money on the wine he brought than he did his flagship the San Antoni!!

Plymouth Rock Beer Run

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via Charisma of BeerSportsBabes.com // The most Iconic American Colony was founded because the Pilgrims ran out of beer!

In the colonial era, drinking water could be quite dangerous due to bacteria in the water. Because of this, most people drank alcoholic drinks, which led to colonials drinking much more alcohol than today’s Americans. In 2015, an American drank an average of two gallons of alcohol per year, while the average colonist drank seven gallons of alcohol per year!

Now considering the above information, the following story may sound less ridiculous. Everyone knows that the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock and started one of the first settlements in the New World. However, the reason for stopping at Plymouth Rock may surprise you; they were running out of beer. We might laugh at that now, but beer was extremely important back then because it would stay drinkable compared to water which could easily turn brackish and deadly. The Mayflower had been sailing for almost two months and was very off-course by the time land was spotted in what is now New England. The captain decided the settlers needed to go ashore so the last of the beer could be saved for the sailors on their return journey home. Thus, what is now considered a party-foul, ended up shaping the course of American history!!

The Prussian Kings of Beer

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via Roland Handrick //

Germans are known to be very serious about their beer, but one man made it a royal family affair. The Prussian King, Friedrich Wilhelm I, is credited with creating the German tradition of “Stammtisch” where people sit around a larger table drinking beer with friends to relax, or just pass some time. He even allowed his son the Crown Prince, Frederick the Great, to become a brewer. During his reign, Frederick the Great banned coffee from Germany when sales of beer diminished, sending large amounts of money out of the country. He believed that coffee would harm the economy and quality of his soldiers. King Frederick the Great is famous for his quotes on beer, including his iconic speech, “My people must drink beer”.

American Rebellion Over Whiskey Tax

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via Getty Images Archive Photos Getty Images // There’s a reason why you don’t mess with an American’s Whiskey

Have you ever heard this story of America’s lesser known “Revolution”? Shortly after the formation of the United States, the newly formed government faced a small-scale revolution from some angry citizens. Western Pennsylvania farmers and Whiskey distillers took up arms after the installation of a new Whiskey tax that taxed those who profited from the distillation and sale of Whiskey. Needless to say, the Americans who went war with England over a Tea Tax weren’t about to let this one go without a fight. The Whiskey Rebellion, as it came to be known, grew so large it required military action by the US government. While mass bloodshed was avoided and the new government showed it could keep control, the spirit of American defiance over whiskey would later create the Moonshiners and Bootleggers of the 20th century.

The Friendliest Arctic Territory Dispute

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via Reddit – Gabrielle Canon // Territory dispute over tiny Artic Island and the exchange of Whiskey

Leave it to Canada and Denmark to have the friendliest territory dispute of all time. These two countries have been having a dispute over uninhabited, Hans island for years. Each country claims the island is in their territory, so periodically their respective militaries go and remove the other country’s flag – and leave behind a bottle of Danish Schnapps or Canadian Whiskey for their troubles. Talk about pleasantries.

Giving Rise to America’s Crime Families

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via Pace // How America’s attempt at sobriety created the rise of organized crime

Alternatively, How America’s attempt to kick its alcohol addiction created the rise of organized crime. Despite the intentions of the Temperance movement, the Prohibition era of US history exchanged sobriety for criminal enterprise. Americans were not ready to give up their hooch, and Bootleg liquor was in high demand. This prompted a very lucrative business venture – all tax-free – for mob bosses from New York to Chicago. The illegal importation, distillation, and distribution of alcohol put some big named mobsters, like Lucky Luciano, on the map. These gangsters, who made it big before the end of Prohibition in 1933, created some of the most violent criminal syndicates whose mark on US history continues today. And it might not have happened if America didn’t try to kick the habit. What did they expect from the country that had a rebellion over a tax on Whiskey?

Try some of our favorite Prohibition Style Cocktails.

Supplying the Troops in WWII

How Alcohol Influenced World History

via Alan Moen [All About Beer] // How beer was helping our boys overseas

Alcohol was always been considered a vital ration to soldiers during war and this was still true during WWII. Making sure that soldiers were supplied with beer was viewed as highly important. In July 1942, British breweries established a “beer for troops” committee to ensure that the troops received supplies of beer. The United States also took the matter seriously, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture mandated that 15% of all beer produced in the U.S. had to be saved for the soldiers. One problem arose from the American beer, though. The cans had to be painted olive green to camouflage them from enemy aircraft. In the end, a small price to pay in the effort to keep the moral high among the troops.

In 1944, the British Royal Navy developed the most zealous proposal for supplying beer to troops during WWII. As the war was also being fought in the Pacific, the British Navy had to figure out how to make sure sailors received their appropriate rations of beer. The solution to the problem was to design a brewing boat that could produce 250 barrels of beer per week. There were many technical problems in the beginning, such as drums of extract exploding. Two boats were selected for the project and were prepared in the summer of 1945 to become breweries. Unfortunately for the project, having been undertaken near the end of the war, it wasn’t very successful. One ship, the Menestheus, was outfitted with the “Davy Jones Brewery” and completed one voyage that consisted of visiting multiple Pacific ports. The Menestheus supplied sailors with English mild ale and after only six months of being operational, sailed back to England and was dismantled. A floating brewery for the military has not been tried since.

 

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Drunk History Behind Classic Cocktails

 

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Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

 

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Corinne – Content Curator

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Corinne, cocktail blogger at Brio Smart Life
This classic Pina Colada recipe will get you all set for Summer!

Classic Piña Colada Recipe

If you like Piña Coladas and our drinks of the week…

The Piña Colada is the perfect summer drink and tastes like a tropical beach vacation.

Drink of the week recipe: Pina Colada

Its name meaning “strained pineapple” in Spanish, and hails from the island of Puerto Rico. The Piña Colada even has its own annual holiday there on July 10th. The Piña Colada of today was created sometime in the 1950s with the invention of the blender and Coco Lopez; however, there are references to a similar drink that was made a century before.

Coco Lopez is a vital ingredient for the cocktail because it replicates rich coconut cream, which is difficult to extract from coconuts. Once Coco Lopez hit the market, everyone from cooks to bartenders started to experiment with it. Luckily for us, the Piña Colada cocktail was one of the creations brought to life with Coco Lopez.

There are three people from Puerto Rico that have claims to the creation of the Piña Colada. The most popular story is that Ramón “Monchito” Marrero Pérez of the Caribe Hilton in San Juan was asked to create a signature drink for the hotel.

After months of trial-and-error, he mixed together a cocktail that used rum, pineapple, condensed milk, and coconut cream on August 16, 1954. Ricardo Garcia, who also worked at the Caribe Hilton, crafted a similarly flavored drink using Coco Lopez, rum, and coconut juice and served the cocktail in a coconut.

On one fateful day, Garcia ran out of coconuts so he served the cocktail in a hollowed out pineapple and that method remains popular to this day. Lastly, Ramón Portas Mingot, head bartender of the Barrachina Restaurant, also made a cocktail using rum and Coco Lopez.

These three bartenders created their cocktails between the years of 1952-1963 and by 1978, the Piña Colada was so famous that Puerto Rico named the delicious drink as its national cocktail…and a hit single for Rupert Holmes.

We’ve tested through a bunch of Piña Colada recipes, but the Original is still the best. The Original Piña Colada Recipe (according to the Caribe Hilton) requires the use of Coco Lopez and a Puerto Rican rum, such as Don Q Cristal.

So let’s show you how to make Piña Coladas.

 

Piña Colada

Yields: 2 Servings

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces White Rum
  • 1 Ounce Coconut cream (Coco Lopez to be authentic)
  • 1 Ounce Heavy cream
  • 6 Ounces Fresh pineapple juice
  • 5 Cups Crushed Ice
  • Pineapple & Cherry for Garnish

Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Tall Glass
  • Jigger
  • Blender

 

Preparation

Piña Colada: Pour ingredients into a blender. Blend until smooth and serve in a tall glass. Garnish with fresh pineapple and a cherry.

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 245 Fat (g) 2.7 Saturated Fat (g) 2.3 Potassium (mg) 100 Carbohydrates (g) 32 Dietary Fiber (g) 0.4 Total Sugars (g) 31 Protein (g) 0.6 Sodium (mg) 8

This classic Pina Colada recipe will get you all set for Summer!

 
 

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Corinne, cocktail blogger at Brio Smart Life
 

About the Author

Corinne – Content Curator

Social Media Addict | Wine Fanatic | Dog Lover | Workout Enthusiast

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need To Drink Right Now

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need to Drink

These rum drinks will take you to paradise!

In honor of National Rum Day, we’re taking a look at five amazing rum drinks! So channel your inner pirate, pretend you’re on a tropical beach and get ready to relax with some rum! Here are 5 remarkable rum drinks you need to drink right now!

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need To Drink Right Now

 


 

Mojito

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need to Drink Right Now - The Mojito

Image / Recipe from // Brio Classic Cocktails

Refreshing is a word that comes to mind when the Mojito is mentioned. This perfect summer drink originated in Cuba over 200 years ago, although the specifics to its creation are unknown. The Mojito became popular through Ernest Hemingway and other famous people who enjoyed the drink while vacationing in Cuba before the Revolution.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces White Rum
  • 1 Ounce Lime Juice
  • 2 Ounces Sparkling Water or Club Soda
  • 1 Ounce Simple Syrup or 1 – 2 Teaspoon(s) Sugar
  • 1 Cup Crushed Ice
  • 20 Sprigs Fresh Mint
  • Lime Twist For Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Highball Glass
  • Spoon or Muddler

How to make a Mojito

Place [sugar and] mint leaves in a serving glass, and gently muddle just until the leaves release their oils. Fill glass with ice. Add rum and lime juice [and simple syrup]. Stir to combine. Top with club soda and add mint sprigs and lime twist for garnish.

 

Planter’s Punch

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need to Drink Right Now - Planter's Punch

Image from // Blahnik Baker

A New York Times’ article from 1908 described the cocktail as “Two of sour, one and a half of sweet, three of strong and four of weak.” Planter’s Punch dates back centuries and can be considered the predecessor of the famous tiki drinks. The cocktail itself can be described as casual and was originally a concoction of rum, lime juice, sugar, spice, and ice; however, there are now many variations of the drink so there is truly a recipe for everyone!

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 3 Ounces Coruba Dark Jamaican Rum (if you can’t find Coruba, substitute another dark, heavy rum)
  • 1 Ounce Simple Syrup
  • .75 Ounce Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3 Dashes Angostura Bitters
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Highball Glass
  • Bar Spoon

How to make Planter’s Punch

Combine ingredients in a tall glass and fill with crushed ice. Swizzle with a bar spoon until a frost forms on the outside of the glass. The ice will settle as you do this; add more crushed ice to fill, garnish with a mint sprig.

 

Mai Tai

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need to Drink Right Now - Mai Tai

Image from // Lisa at Food.com

The Mai Tai is a classic rum drink that has not been treated well over the years. The recipe has been altered by the tourism industry to the point where many people have never actually had a true Mai Tai. The original cocktail, invented by Vic Bergeron of Trader Vic’s, consisted of Jamaican rum, fresh lime juice, Dutch curacao, French orgeat, and a sprig of fresh mint for garnish. This concoction has a subtle flavor of oranges and almonds due to the curacao and orgeat. If you’ve ever had a Mai Tai and been disappointed, give the recipe below a try. You may just be pleasantly surprised with the taste of a true Mai Tai.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Jamaican Rum
  • Juice of One Lime (Save shell for garnish)
  • 0.5 Ounce Curaçao
  • 0.25 Ounce Orgeat
  • 0.25 Ounce Rock-Randy Syrup (Add a drop or two of vanilla extract to our simple syrup recipe)
  • Mint For Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Double Old-Fashioned Glass
  • Cocktail Shaker

How to make the Mai Tai Cocktail

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Shake well for 10 seconds and strain into a double old-fashioned glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with lime shell and a sprig of fresh mint.

 

Hurricane

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need to Drink Right Now - The Hurricane

Image from // Boston.com

The Hurricane is a tiki drink known for being quite strong while still having a fruity taste, so if that’s up your alley, you’ll love this cocktail. The Hurricane was created in New Orleans in the 1940s at Pat O’brein’s bar. This is a cocktail that started off simple and has become more complex over the years.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Dark Jamaican Rum
  • 2 Ounces White Rum
  • 2 Ounces Passion Fruit Juice
  • 1 Ounce Lime Juice
  • 1 Ounce Orange Juice
  • .5 Ounce Simple Syrup
  • .5 Ounce Grenadine
  • 1 Orange Slice For Garnish
  • 1 Cherry For Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Hurricane Glass
  • Cocktail Shaker

How to make a Hurricane Cocktail

Add all the ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake, and strain into a large Hurricane glass filled with fresh ice. Garnish with an orange half-wheel and a cherry.

 

Dark and Stormy

5 Remarkable Rum Drinks You Need to Drink Right Now - Dark and Stormy

Image / Recipe from // Brio Drink Of The Week

This easy to make cocktail is often claimed to be Bermuda’s national drink. A Dark and Stormy has a very simple recipe as there are only two main ingredients, dark rum and ginger beer. But if you want to call your drink a “Dark ‘N Stormy”, you best adhere to Gosling’s Patented and Trademarked recipe, that uses Gosling’s Black Seal Rum and ginger beer. No joke, Gosling holds certificates at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for the drink’s recipe and name. The cocktail was crafted near the end of World War I when British sailors were on leave in Bermuda and they mixed Gosling’s Black Seal Rum with ginger beer that was made on the island. The result was a dark, murky mixture that earned the cocktail its name. It is said that a British sailor stated the cocktail looked like “the color of a cloud that only a fool or a dead man would sail under.” Check out Gosling’s recipe below.

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 1.5 Ounces Gosling’s Black Seal Rum
  • 4-5 Ounces Ginger Beer
  • Lime Wedge for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Highball Glass

How to make the Dark and Stormy Cocktail

In a tall glass filled with ice, add 4 – 5 ounces of ginger beer and top with 1.5 ounces Gosling’s Black Seal Rum. Garnish with a lime wedge.

 

Corinne, cocktail blogger at Brio Smart Life
 

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This is how you make a Caipirinha fit for an Olympian!

Medal Worthy Caipirinha

Celebrate the Summer Games with Brazilian Cocktails!

The 2016 summer games has been filled with a lot of controversy, but all we’ll be filling is another glass of Caipirinhas.

Drink of the week: Classic Lime Caipirinha

Hey Brio drink of the week lovers! We’ve been having a lot of fun watching the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Brazil. Our home team has been kicking butt! In that spirit, we decided to dedicate this week’s drink of the week to the national cocktail of Brazil, the Caipirinha. This Caipirinha recipe will be the perfect addition to any Olympic closing ceremony viewing party!

There used to be a Brazilian Steakhouse in town that made a killer Caipirinha, but they went out of business. It was so sad. I haven’t had one since they closed, so when the Olympic games started in Rio, I took a perusal through Pinterest to see how I could make some while I watched the opening ceremonies with my mom [It’s tradition – we just add cocktails now].

The name is pronounced kai-pee-ree-nyah, but I always get tongue tied trying to properly pronounce it. Portuguese is definitely not my forte. The Caipirinha is a cousin of the Mojito, and is made with Cachaça. If you’ve never had Cachaça before it’s a little like rum, but has more of a tart taste to it. When muddles together with lime and sugar, cachaça becomes an enjoyable treat. Stateside, this drink makes a perfect summer cocktail and a great addition to watching the summer Olympic games.

This is how you make a medal worthy Caipirinha!

 

Caipirinha

Yields: 6 Servings

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Cachaça
  • 2 Teaspoons Granulated Sugar
  • 2 Small Limes, Quartered
  • Lime Wheel for Garnish

Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Old Fashioned Glasses
  • Muddler or Long Spoon

 

Preparation

Caipirinha: Muddle limes and sugar together at the bottom of an old-fashioned glass until sugar dissolves. Add ice to glass, and top with cachaça. Stir together, and add more ice. Garnish with lime wheel, and enjoy!

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 263 Fat (g) 0.15 Saturated Fat (g) 0.018 Potassium (mg) 81 Carbohydrates (g) 16.62 Dietary Fiber (g) 2.1 Total Sugars (g) 9.65 Protein (g) 0.55 Sodium (mg) 4

This is how you make a Caipirinha fit for an Olympian!

 
 

How have you been enjoying the 2016 Summer Olympic Games? Tell us in the comments section and enjoy our other Drink Of the Week cocktails by clicking the banner below!

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Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

Delicious Grapefruit Margaritas with Ruby Red Grapefruit

Grapefruit Margarita

This is one fruity frozen cocktail

These grapefruit margaritas are a sweet frozen treat ready for this summer heat.

Drink of the week: Grapefruit Margaritas

Fruity margaritas are a summertime staple, and this drink of the week is a very sweet frozen treat. Grapefruit margaritas are some of my favorites. They are tangy, tasty, and damn right yummy. I was introduced to grapefruit margaritas at a baby shower. They used them as a way to let everyone know that they were having a little girl. It was a cute touch.

We’ve mixed up a few different margaritas before in the Brio Smart Life Kitchen, but these are some of the tastiest by far. I also wasn’t really strict with the bottling for this recipe either. I just used what I had left of the Lunazul Blanco Tequila from when we made the Blood Orange Margaritas and some Deep Eddy’s Ruby Red vodka, but use any kind of grapefruit vodka you like. You can use freshly squeezed grapefruit juice or from the carton, it won’t hurt the drink in any way if you choose to use Tropicana. I take shortcuts too and got some fresh grapefruit juice from our local fresh market.

Frozen cocktails are not everyone’s shot of whiskey. Some people like their margaritas on the rocks, and you can totally do this recipe that way if you feel so inclined. Since I made this as a frozen recipe, if you want to do these on the rocks: Forgo the blender for a cocktail shaker and pour the cocktail over ice. It’s simple really.

So let’s show you how to make these Grapefruit Margaritas.

 

Grapefruit Margarita

Yields: 6 Servings
Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 6 Ounces Blanco Tequila
  • 2.5 Ounces Red Grapefruit Vodka
  • 8 Ounces Fresh Grapefruit Juice
  • 2 Ounces Simple Syrup
  • 1 Ounce Lime Juice
  • Grapefruit Sections for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Short Glasses
  • Jigger
  • Blender
  • Salt or Sugar for Rims [Optional]

 

Preparation

How to Rim the Glass: Run a section of the grapefruit wedge along the rim of the glass. Dip rim into the salt or sugar to evenly coat. Set aside.

Grapefruit Margarita: In a blender, pour tequila, vodka, grapefruit juice, simple syrup, and lime juice over 3 to 4 cups of ice. Blend until smooth, and pour into glasses. Garnish with section of grapefruit. Enjoy!

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 166 Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Potassium (mg) 91 Carbohydrates (g) 22 Dietary Fiber (g) 0.8 Total Sugars (g) 19.2 Protein (g) 0.4 Sodium (mg) 32

Delicious Grapefruit Margaritas with Ruby Red Grapefruit

 
 
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Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

How to make your own Sweet and Sour Mix

How to Make Homemade Sweet & Sour Mix

Swap Store-Bought for Handmade

This homemade sweet and sour mix is perfect for all of your home brewed cocktails.

Make your own Sweet & Sour mix

Sweet and Sour mix, also referred to as simply Sour mix, is a cocktail mix that consists of a blend of sugar, lemon, and lime juices. Sour mix is used in a variety of cocktails & mocktails.

This homemade sweet and sour mix uses freshly squeezed lemon and lime juices instead of processed store-bought juices that can contain extra sugars and other kinds of preservatives. Because our mix is fresh and not preserved, it will last in the fridge for a little over a week or two. That is if you don’t use it all making cocktails, of course.

This is how to make our own sweet and sour mix.

 

Sweet & Sour Mix

Yields: About 2 1/2 to 3 Cups

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 12 Ounces Water
  • 12 Ounces Sugar
  • 8 Ounces Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 8 Ounces Fresh Lime Juice

Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Small Pot
  • Heat Proof Container

 

Preparation

Sour Mix: Bring water to a boil over medium heat. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Remove pot for the heat and stir in the lime and lemon juices.

Pour into a heat proof, covered container. Store in the fridge.

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 28 Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Potassium (mg) 9 Carbohydrates (g) 7 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 7 Protein (g) 0 Sodium (mg) 33

How to make your own Sweet and Sour Mix

 

 

 

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About the Author

Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger