Japanese Whiskey Takes Market By Storm

The New Wave of Whiskey: Japanese Whiskey Takes Market By Storm

The world of whiskey is getting wider

Some of the world’s best whiskeys are made in…Japan? The Land of the Rising Sun is becoming a big player on the World Stage of Whiskey.

Japanese Distillers Take Whiskey Market By Storm

Image from Sydney Bar Week // The Land of the Rising Sun is becoming a big player on the World Stage of Whiskey.

Japan. Home of beautiful sights, awe-inspiring history & culture, and award winning whiskey tradition. You read that right. Japan is becoming a big player on the world stage of Whiskey.

Japanese Whiskey has been growing in popularity in the U.S. over the last few years, and we can see why. Americans love whiskey! Our thirst for bourbon and whiskey is a powerful one, and it is also an expensive one.

Prices for Japanese whiskey run the gamut from anywhere around $20 bucks a bottle to close to a couple grand. A bottle of 1960 Karuizawa whiskey sold at a Hong Kong auction for $118,500 last August.

Don’t let the sticker shock completely turn you off to the idea of trying Japanese Whiskey. There are plenty of fantastic Japanese Whiskey options that you can get in the U.S. for less than $100 a bottle. Here are some great Japanese Whiskies you can get without breaking the bank.

 

Suntory Whisky Toki (~$30)

The New Wave of Whiskey

Image from // Suntory

If you want to jump into the world of Japanese whiskey without taking a chunk out of your wallet, Suntory Whisky Toki is a great start. This whiskey is 1) widely available state side and 2) under $40 depending on where you live (We can get it here in NC for $30 plus tax). This light golden whiskey is subtly sweet with a spicy finish, and has notes of honey and vanilla. Suntory Whisky Toki can be enjoyed neat or try it in a cocktail like a Highball or Whiskey Sour.

 

Hibiki Japanese Harmony (~$65)

The New Wave of Whiskey

Image from // Suntory

Like single malts? Give Hibiki Japanese Harmony a try! The Hibiki is a light, young, blended whiskey that is aged in Mizunara Japanese oak casks. It is easy to drink and has a subtle spiciness of cinnamon and clove. The sweetness of this whiskey makes it a little more approachable for new Whiskey drinkers, but it could be a little too sweet for some folks. It is definitely a decent introduction to the Hibiki blends.

 

Nikka Taketsuru Pure Malt (~$70)

The New Wave of Whiskey

Image from // tabelog

Matured in sherry wood you say? Sign us up. The Taketsuru Pure Malt is a blended malt whiskey that is aged about 10 years to give it a smooth, rich, and clean mouthfeel. The whiskey has just the right amount of sweetness from Sherried fruit, but not a lot of smokiness. It has a fruity richness that lingers in your mouth with a slight touch of Espresso flavor. This is one of our favorite whiskies to splurge on so far.

 

Suntory Hakushu 12 years old (~$85)

The New Wave of Whiskey

Image from // Suntory

Fans of smoky whiskey, I think you might find Hakushu 12 years old to your liking. They call Hakushu a “green and fresh” whiskey, and it is very much a spot-on description. This whiskey has a pleasing aroma that is reminiscent of the forests of its birthplace. It has more of an herbal palate with just a touch of fruitiness, and it has that smoke you expect from a good whiskey. The Hakushu 12 year is one of the best Japanese Whiskies you can get under $100. Be prepared to fall in love with this whiskey.

 

Yamazaki 12 years old(~$85)

The New Wave of Whiskey

Image from // andersnoren

Yamazaki is the number 1 single malt whiskey in Japan for good reason! This whiskey gets a lot of its character from the use of vanilla, citrus fruits, and Mizunara oak. Yamazaki 12 year is a light bodied whiskey that is comparable to a fruitier Highland whiskey. It is worth a taste if you can find it near you.

 

 

Kellie, head blogger at Brio Smart Life

About the Author

Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

the everything guide to glassware

The Everything Guide To Glassware

Presentation Can Be Everything!

In whatever bar you go to, bartenders can be very choosy about how they serve up their cocktails. There are a lot of types of glassware at your disposal, and mixologists don’t always use the same type of glasses for the same cocktails.

So that poses a question: Does glassware really make the cocktail? Well in this everything guide to glassware, we’re going to breakdown of the different types of glasses and why we use them to serve our cocktails.

The Everything Guide to Glassware

 

Rocks – Old Fashioned – Lowball

The Rocks glass, also known as an Old Fashioned or Lowball, is a short glass that generally holds around 4 to 12 ounces of liquid. It is a very versatile class of glassware as bartenders use them to both build and serve up cocktails. Whiskey is one of the most common spirits served in a rocks glass. The rocks glass became synonymous with the Old Fashioned cocktail, hence why it is often referred to as an Old Fashioned glass.

[make a cocktail using this glass: Maple-Bourbon Smash]

 

Highball – Collins – Delmonico

This tall, cylindrical cocktail glass family has slightly different variations in their shape. The Delmonico is the shortest and has a slight flare at the rim, the Collins is slightly more narrow and tall, and the Highball is a little wider but shorter than the Collins. These glasses were designed to keep cocktails cold and to help hold their carbonation. Highballs make the perfect glasses for tall cocktails that are served over ice, or have some form of carbonation.

[make a cocktail using this glass: Gin Rickey ]

 

Nick and Nora

The elegant looking Nick & Nora glass was named after the main characters from the Thin Man film series. This tulip glass is often used as an alternative to the Martini and Coupe glasses for delightful presentation. The Nick and Nora is a great glass to serve up martinis, manhattans, and rob roys.

[make a cocktail using this glass: Rob Roy]

 

Coupe

Originally designed as a Champagne glass, the coupe’s curved shape helps prevent cocktails from spilling out. Cocktails in this glass are served neat, meaning no ice, to show off their clarity. Mixologists tend to use this glass in place of a traditional martini glass for presentation purposes.

[make a cocktail using this glass: The Ice Queen]

 

Cocktail

Probably the most iconic of cocktail glassware, the Cocktail glass vary in size and slope. The glass’ shape has an interesting flaw. Cocktails in this V-shaped glass are easily spilled mid-transport, so it’s best not to fill the cocktail to the top. The cocktail glass has become synonymous with the number one cocktail served in it, the Martini, but note there is no real such thing as a separate Martini Glass.

[make a cocktail using this glass: Cosmopolitan ]

 

Champagne Flute

This tall, slender, stemmed glass was designed to help offset the quickness that Champagne loses its carbonation. It is typically only used to serve straight Champagne or Champaign-based cocktails, like Bellinis and Mimosas.

[make a cocktail using this glass: Kir Royale]

 

Julep Cup – Mule Mug

These iconic metal cups are used to serve up Julep and Mule cocktails. The metal cups are supposed to affect the temperature of the cocktail, keeping it colder longer. Julep cups are traditionally made of Sterling or Pewter and are a standard tall, cylindrical shape; while Mule mugs are made of Copper and are typically round but can vary in shape.

[make a cocktail using this glass: Mint Julep ]

 

Margarita

This festively curved stemmed glass is named after the classic cocktail that is traditionally served in it. The shape of the margarita glass is modeled after the Coupe, adding presentation and functionality to the glass. While it’s often used for frozen cocktails from Margaritas to Daiquiris, it is common to serve margaritas in other glasses as well.

[make a cocktail using this glass: Classic Margarita ]

 

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Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

How to make Rosemary Simple Syrup - Brio Smart Life Blog

Rosemary Simple Syrup

How to make Rosemary Simple Syrup

How to Make Rosemary Simple Syrup

Simple syrup comes in a variety of flavors, and one of the ones we’ve used the most is this Rosemary Simple Syrup. If you are making a rosemary infused cocktail, 9 times out of 10 you’ll be adding rosemary simple syrup to the mix.

Rosemary adds an herbal flavor to spring and summer cocktails, and your kitchen will smell fantastic as you are making it. This simple Rosemary syrup is super easy to make, and you can put it in a container to use it again later.

Test out this Rosemary Simple Syrup Recipe with our Azalea Belle Drink of the Week Cocktail.

 

Rosemary Simple Syrup

Yields: 1 1/2 cups
Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 1 Cup Water
  • 1 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3 to 5 Sprigs of Rosemary
Items You’ll Need:

  • Medium Saucepan
  • Strainer
  • Container

 

Preparation

Rosemary Simple Syrup: In a medium saucepan, stir together sugar and rosemary sprigs in water over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, and boil until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat, and let stand 30 minutes. Pour liquid through a strainer into an airtight container. Cover and chill for 4 hours.

 

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 16 Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Potassium (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 4.2 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 4.2 Protein (g) 0 Sodium (mg) 0

 

 

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About the Author

Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

Easy Made Simple Syrup

Easy Made Simple Syrup

Easy Made Simple Syrup

Looking for an easy Simple Syrup recipe?

Well look no further! I’ve been debating for a while about creating a separate section for what I call Bar Essentials – The Odds and Ends of what your home bar needs. I usually include the steps of how to make these ingredients in the Drinks of the Week, but it was getting tedious writing it out over and over. So, the idea for this section was born.

Simple syrup is one of the many essential ingredients to have in your home bar. Many cocktails use it, and you can use it as a sweetener for other drinks like coffee and tea.

Did I mention how ridiculously easy it is to make yet? This easy made simple syrup only has two ingredients and is ready to use in little over an hour. You can make it ahead of time, chill it overnight, and keep it on hand for party cocktails. This homemade simple syrup is super easy to make. Let’s get started, shall we?

 

Simple Syrup

Yields: 1 1/2 cups
Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 1 Cup Water
  • 1 Cup Granulated Sugar
Items You’ll Need:

  • Medium Saucepan
  • Strainer
  • Container

 

Preparation

Easy Made Simple Syrup: In a medium saucepan, stir together sugar and water over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, and boil until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat, and let stand 30 minutes. Pour liquid through a strainer into an airtight container. Cover and chill for at least a 1/2 hour.

 

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 16 Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Potassium (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 4.2 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 4.2 Protein (g) 0 Sodium (mg) 0

 

 

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About the Author

Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger