The Sidecar: A Classic Prohibition Style cocktail

The Sidecar: A Classic Prohibition Era Cocktail

It’s a speakeasy favorite cocktail

Simple. Elegant. Delicious. Three words that pretty much sum up this fantastic, simple Prohibition Era Sidecar cocktail recipe.

Prohibition Era Classic Sidecar Recipe

Classic and simple. That’s how we describe the Sidecar cocktail. With only three ingredients and a sweet garnish, it’s not surprising that this classic cocktail was a speakeasy favorite.

The Sidecar is one of the most iconic cocktails of the Prohibition era, and is probably one of the most simple. It didn’t require any fancy ingredients that were hard to find or acquire; all it needed was Cognac, Cointreau, and lemon juice. The cocktail was strong, simple, and delicious, and we can continue to sip on them today.

If you are new to the world of Cognac cocktails here’s a bit of a heads up: Cognac has a very strong taste. It’s a liquor you are meant to sip, not shoot back, and the good stuff comes with a price tag.

Cognac can easily overpower [and overwhelm] a cocktail if done incorrectly, but this Sidecar recipe gets the blend just right. The citrus of Cointreau and fresh lemon juice help to mellow out the strong alcohol taste of the Cognac. The sugar on the rim is also an added bonus.

With a cocktail this elegant looking, it’s important to keep your glassware in mind. For the Sidecar cocktail, most bartenders will use either a coupe or cocktail glass. I have a preference using the coupe, because I love its shape and sophistication, but a sugar rimmed cocktail glass is always a classic option.

This is how you make this classic Sidecar cocktail!

 

Sidecar Cocktail

Yields: 1 Serving
Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 2 Ounces Cognac
  • 1 Ounce Cointreau
  • ¾ Ounce Fresh Lemon Juice
  • Sugar Rim for Garnish
Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Coupe or Cocktail Glass
  • Cocktail Shaker
  • Small Plate

 

Preparation

Sugar Rims: Fill a small plate with superfine sugar, making sure the sugar on the plate is thick enough to cover the rim of your glass. Run a lemon or lime wedge along the rim of the glass. Dip rim into the sugar to evenly coat. Shake off excess and set aside.

Sidecar Cocktail: Add Cognac, Cointreau, and lemon juice to a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake until chilled, about 20 to 30 seconds. Then, strain into a chilled sugar rimmed coupe or cocktail glass. Enjoy!

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 282 Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Potassium (mg) 29.8 Carbohydrates (g) 4.1 Dietary Fiber (g) 0.4 Total Sugars (g) 2.7 Protein (g) 0 Sodium (mg) 2

The Sidecar: A Classic Prohibition Style cocktail

 
Hand Crafted: Classic Cocktail Recipes from the Brio Smart Life Blog
 

Kellie, head blogger at Brio Smart Life

About the Author

Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

Original New Orleans Style Sazerac recipe from the Brio Smart Life Blog

Original New Orleans Style Sazerac

The Big Easy knows how to make cocktails!

This Big Easy Nightcap is a true American classic. Try this original Sazerac recipe that’ll make you feel that New Orleans hospitality.

Drink of the week: Original New Orleans Style Sazerac

The history behind this classic American cocktail is rather interesting. Invented by Creole pharmacist and inventor of Peychaud’s bitters, Antoine Peychaud, the original Sazerac was a combination of rye whiskey, Absinthe, rich simple syrup, and Peychaud’s Bitters. This Pre-Prohibition era cocktail wouldn’t let the US ban of Absinthe pull it off the cocktail menu. The Sazerac Company got clever and began to use Herbsaint, an anise-flavored liquor, as a substitute for Absinthe.

The Sazerac recipe often juggles back and forth between Cognac and Rye Whiskey. Every bartender I have ever ordered this cocktail from uses the Cognac version of the recipe. They call it the old New Orleans way to make this cocktail, hence why I decided to call this the New Orleans Style Sazerac. Cognac is an acquired taste. It can overpower pretty much everything else in this cocktail, so, for me, the [cognac] Sazerac is one of those sipping cocktails I could nurse all evening.

A proper sazerac is served neat in a rocks/old fashioned glass. So I’ll leave it up to you to decide if you want to make this sazerac with cognac or rye whiskey. You can’t really go wrong either way.

Now let’s show you how you make a Sazerac!

 

Sazerac

Yields: 1 Serving

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • ½ Ounce Absinthe
  • 2 Ounces Cognac [or Sazerac Rye Whiskey]
  • ½ Ounce Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
  • Lemon Twist for Garnish

Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Rocks Glass
  • Mixing Glass

 

Preparation

Sazerac: Rinse a chilled rocks glass with absinthe and fill the glass with ice. In a mixing glass, pour cognac, simple syrup, and bitters over ice. Stir together for 30 seconds.

Discard the ice from the prepared glass and pour off the excess absinthe. Strain cocktail into the chilled glass, and garnish with a lemon twist. Enjoy!

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 174 Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Potassium (mg) 7 Carbohydrates (g) 8.5 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 0.1 Protein (g) 0 Sodium (mg) 7

Original New Orleans Style Sazerac recipe from the Brio Smart Life Blog

 

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About the Author

Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger

How to make a classic Grasshopper

How to Make a Classic Grasshopper

Interesting Name for a Sweet Cocktail

If you like sweet minty goodness, get ready for this chocolate topped Grasshopper – the cocktail that is.

Classic Grasshopper Recipe

Image / Recipe from // TheDrinkBlog – via DrinkWire

Grasshopper. A Grasshopper is one of those classic cocktails that comes to mind when you hear the words crème de menthe. It brings to mind a pale greenish color, minty flavor, and images of Raj Koothrappali from the Big Bang Theory.

Like many other classic American cocktails, the Grasshopper calls the Big Easy home. Tujague’s, New Orlean’s Second oldest restaurant down in the French Corner, is credited with being the originator of this cocktail thanks to Philibert Guichet, who invented the cocktail for a contest. The cocktail entry won second place, and Guichet launched the cocktail at Tujague’s after he purchased the joint from its original owners.

While a bit boozy, this sweet minty cocktail won’t have the same burn as say a Rob Roy would. Making the Grasshopper a popular introductory cocktail for first-time drinkers.

This cocktail blends Cognac, crème de menthe, crème de cacao, and heavy cream into as Raj would say, “a sweet green miracle.” While I’m not the biggest fan of dairy-based cocktails, they sit heavy in my stomach, this cocktail does have a good taste to it. For those who love it, the Grasshopper can make a great holiday drink to replace boring old eggnog come Christmas time.

One of the most popular ways to garnish this cocktail is with chocolate. Let’s face it, chocolate and mint were made for each other. I love dark chocolate more than milk chocolate, so I took a cheese grater ​to a bar of Hershey’s Special Dark chocolate to garnish our Grasshoppers.

Celebrate National Crème de Menthe Day [09.15.16] with a Grasshopper and our other creme de menthe cocktails.

So let’s take a look at how to make a Grasshopper Cocktail.

 

Grasshopper

Yields: 1 Serving

Ingredients You’ll Need:

  • 1½ Ounces Cognac
  • 1 Ounce Green Crème De Menthe
  • 1 OunceWhite Crème De Cacao
  • 1½ Ounces Heavey Cream
  • Chocolate Shavings for Garnish

Glassware and Items You’ll Need:

  • Coupe or Martini Glass
  • Jigger
  • Cocktail Shaker w/Strainer

 

Preparation

Grasshopper: Pour Cognac, Crème De Menthe, Crème De Cacao and Heavy Cream into a cocktail shaker with ice. Give it a good shake. Pour into a coupe or martini glass, and top with chocolate shavings. Enjoy!

Nutritional Content

1 serving approximately contains: Calories (kcal) 164 Fat (g) 3.59 Saturated Fat (g) 2.17 Potassium (mg) 40 Carbohydrates (g) 15.31 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 14.6 Protein (g) 0 Sodium (mg) 14

How to make a classic Grasshopper

 
 

Hand Crafted: Classic Cocktail Recipes from the Brio Smart Life Blog

 

Blog Author - Avatar
 

About the Author

Kellie – Head of Content Creation

Creative Director | Web Designer | Blogger | Sake Enthusiast | Resident Ginger